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Old 05-26-2010, 08:59 AM
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Default Pilot Bearing Puller Tool

This is definately not something new as I found it on MUD, but I recall having some issues with pulling the pilot bearing when we were putting a new clutch in the Geko. Between Tom (mostly Tom) and myself we struggled with getting the old pilot bearing out. We ended up heading into to town and getting a loaner from the parts store. Even then, we were having issues until Issac suggested putting the flywheel on to get a flat surface for the puller.

The make the Pilot Bearing Puller tool, you will need some materials; a carrige bolt a few nuts, a washer and small piece of flat stock. The fabrication tools used are a grinder and drill. Basically, you grind the head of the carriage bolt to make a hook and use the drill to put a hole in the flat stock for the bolt to go through.

I used a 5/16" carrige bolt that was 4" long. When grinding the head of the bolt, the objective is to get the size of the head small and square so that it can be slipped into the pilot bearing and the hook to be just shallow enough to hold the back of the bearing. If you grind the hook too deep into the bolt body, it looses strength and will straighten up before pulling the bearing out - AMHIK. When drilling the hole for the bolt, it just needs to be big enough for the bolt to go through.

With the fabrication work done, you assemble the tool. Run the bolt through the hole in the flat stock, put on the washer, put on the lower nut, put on the top nuts. You then tighten the top nuts against each other. Here are some photos of the tool.





Others have used a large socket instead of the flat stock and one fellow used the hole at the end of a pry bar. I tried it with a couple of sockets but ended up prefering the small piece of flat stock.

To use the tool, you hook the back end of the pilot bearing and then tighten lower nut down until it is snug. You then hold the top nuts in place and continue to tighten the lower nut. As you do this, the distance between the hook and flat stock decreases which pulls the pilot bearing out. You may need to adjust the hook position a couple of times so that the bearing comes out evenly.

Works very well and for less than a buck in materials is easy on the wallet and less expensive than driving to the parts store for a loaner tool.
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:46 AM
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A useful trick for really tough pilot bearings for your library of "why didn't I think of that tricks." Fill the cavity with grease, start your pilot shaft or whatever you have that fits the bushing/bearing hole snugly, tap with an aggressive smack with a rubber hammer the free end of the pilot what-not your using and it will blow the bushing/bearing right out! Suggestion: put a shop rag over the bearing unless you like the softness your face can have with some EP lube rubbed in.
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Uncle Ben View Post
A useful trick for really tough pilot bearings for your library of "why didn't I think of that tricks." Fill the cavity with grease, start your pilot shaft or whatever you have that fits the bushing/bearing hole snugly, tap with an aggressive smack with a rubber hammer the free end of the pilot what-not your using and it will blow the bushing/bearing right out! Suggestion: put a shop rag over the bearing unless you like the softness your face can have with some EP lube rubbed in.
Yup, others have also stuffed bread up in there. It is less messy than grease.
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Uncle Ben View Post
A useful trick for really tough pilot bearings for your library of "why didn't I think of that tricks." Fill the cavity with grease, start your pilot shaft or whatever you have that fits the bushing/bearing hole snugly, tap with an aggressive smack with a rubber hammer the free end of the pilot what-not your using and it will blow the bushing/bearing right out! Suggestion: put a shop rag over the bearing unless you like the softness your face can have with some EP lube rubbed in.
While normally a good trick, this does not usually work for mini truck's, at least not with the 22re and 3vze.

Having done 4 or 5 clutches on those two motors now, it is usually common to break at least one pilot bearing puller tool, before getting it out. Once, we busted two.

Cutting it is difficult, but most of the time, you have to carefully maul the bearing in order to get it out.

These are not your typical pilot bearings.
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Old 05-26-2010, 11:06 AM
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A buddy on mine that has done a lot of trans and transfer case work helped with my on my other 4x4 and we used the grease method. His suggestion to fill the hole for the smack method is to use a socket with an extension that fits the hole. he believed that the extra air from the depth of the socket pushes a little better when smacked. some kind of a vacum trick i guess. I would of never believed it until i seen it work. it may be a wives tale also. and covering up is a good thing. Never seen a or tore into a 22re but you never know.
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Old 05-26-2010, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by RedCreeper View Post
A buddy on mine that has done a lot of trans and transfer case work helped with my on my other 4x4 and we used the grease method. His suggestion to fill the hole for the smack method is to use a socket with an extension that fits the hole. he believed that the extra air from the depth of the socket pushes a little better when smacked. some kind of a vacum trick i guess. I would of never believed it until i seen it work. it may be a wives tale also. and covering up is a good thing. Never seen a or tore into a 22re but you never know.
Have had worn pilot bearings that are stubborn because the grease can squeeze through the race to easy. A piece of plastic wrap or piece of baggy the size of the bearing or even slightly larger put in as packing with the edges first works wonders! If the hydrological method doesn't work you're not doing it right! Liquid is not compressible! I have broke the ears off of my slide hammer pilot puller before on a stubborn bearing and use grease as a backup....done correctly it will not fail! The grease methoud will also work on stubborn drive dowels on spindle hubs.....drill a 1/8" hole through the side of the hub just behind the dowel. Fill it with grease and use a straight shanked drift punch. it might take a couple of tries as there might be an air pocket that needs to be replaced but the broken dowel will fly out! You can fill the drilled hole with a small weld and grind it clean or use a little body glazing putty and hide the hole so it can be used in the future.
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