Rising Sun Member Forums  

Go Back   Rising Sun Member Forums > Toyota 4x4 > General Tech Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #51  
Old 07-12-2010, 11:14 AM
DaveInDenver's Avatar
DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
Hard Core 4+
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Larimer County
Posts: 6,613
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FJBRADY View Post
Curious, what's the reason for "cooking/heating" the metal?
Less chance of ruining the heat treatment or creating new internal stresses or warping.
__________________
'91 Toyota Pickup
'09 Kawasaki KLR650
'12 Gunnar Rockhound 29

"To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering." -- Friedrich Nietzsche
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 07-12-2010, 11:17 AM
FJBRADY's Avatar
FJBRADY FJBRADY is offline
Rising Sun Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Highlands Ranch
Posts: 2,061
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveInDenver View Post
Less chance of ruining the heat treatment.
Makes sense. Thx, Dave!
__________________
Steve Brady
TLCA # 19524
KD0JVZ

97 LX450
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 07-12-2010, 11:24 AM
DaveInDenver's Avatar
DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
Hard Core 4+
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Larimer County
Posts: 6,613
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FJBRADY View Post
Makes sense. Thx, Dave!
Preheating and/or postheating are usually required when dealing with certified welds, like pipelines and pressure vessels. Also helps make sure the material is absolutely free of moisture or condensation. That has a couple of problems, one is obviously from the popping, but water introduces hydrogen into the weld which creates metallurgical issues, too. FWIW, it's stuff like this why I am strictly against using bumpers and sliders as air tanks. Even if the welds seems nice and the design is free of pressure risers (like say all corners are round), all it takes is one small mistake to create a potentially dangerous fragmentation grenade.
__________________
'91 Toyota Pickup
'09 Kawasaki KLR650
'12 Gunnar Rockhound 29

"To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering." -- Friedrich Nietzsche
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 07-12-2010, 11:37 AM
AxleIke's Avatar
AxleIke AxleIke is offline
Rising Sun Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Arvada, CO
Posts: 3,422
Default

Thanks Dave! Obviously I was just going off of recommendations.

Steve, the other reason for heating before the weld is because of the material thickness.

Don't quote me, but I have read that you can weld thicker material with a smaller welder the hotter the material is.

My MM175 is a great little box, but it starts to struggle at 3/8". Because I was welding 1/4 to a 1" rod, I wanted it as hot as possible to start, so that I would get adequate penetration on the welds.

The other reason was that this is a forged piece.

As far as I know, forged pieces of steel are cast steel that is then re heated to red hot, then smashed over and over again with a huge hammer. These days' the hammers are huge machines with forging plates that are in the shape of the part.

Forging re-aligns the metal crystals inside the part and generally makes the part more resistant to cracking and fracturing.

Again, don't quote me on that.

However, in the event that there were any imperfections in this part, heating the piece before hand helps to ensure that the welds will not induce areas of stress and cause the piece to crack next to the weld.

A common thing in the off road world is to link dana 60 axles under trucks. However, the 60's often have cast housings, which means that if you weld to them cold, your link tabs will just crack off. However, heating the housing with a rosebud before welding, then running the weld, and then re heating will eliminate this issue.

I figured, preheating and post heating, even this little bit, couldn't hurt, so I gave it a shot.
__________________
Isaac

Baby Beast 2- 1999 4Runner SR5

Baby Beast -1987 4Runner SR5-Gone, but not forgotten

Generation Dead
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 07-12-2010, 12:03 PM
rover67's Avatar
rover67 rover67 is offline
Rising Sun Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Boulder, Co
Posts: 5,418
Default

You can also "peen" cast parts as they are cooling to prevent cracking. I have done this before and it works well.
__________________
Marco Capote
KDGWX
85 FJ60
82 FJ40
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 07-12-2010, 12:21 PM
DaveInDenver's Avatar
DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
Hard Core 4+
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Larimer County
Posts: 6,613
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AxleIke View Post
A common thing in the off road world is to link dana 60 axles under trucks. However, the 60's often have cast housings, which means that if you weld to them cold, your link tabs will just crack off. However, heating the housing with a rosebud before welding, then running the weld, and then re heating will eliminate this issue.
If you are in the presence of good blacksmiths and metalworkers it's really pretty amazing to watch how using a rosebud, hammer and anvil demonstrates in 5 minutes what all the textbooks and classes in the world try to explain about internal stress creating and reliving.
Quote:
I figured, preheating and post heating, even this little bit, couldn't hurt, so I gave it a shot.
That's a good point, AFAIK it never can hurt to do.
__________________
'91 Toyota Pickup
'09 Kawasaki KLR650
'12 Gunnar Rockhound 29

"To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering." -- Friedrich Nietzsche
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 08-01-2010, 11:01 PM
AxleIke's Avatar
AxleIke AxleIke is offline
Rising Sun Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Arvada, CO
Posts: 3,422
Default

So, bummer thing about having a house now is that sometimes I get wrapped up in house projects and the truck sits for a while. But, this weekend, I got some time, and Baby Beast is driving again! Though, in desperate need of an alignment.

Couple pics:

Painting:

I trimmed down some of the gussets because there was going to be clearance issues. Also, a little lighter this way LOL





I then spent some time taking off the nuts on both the idler and steering box, and put on loctite, and torqued them to 70 ft lbs. Hopefully that is good. But I'll be checking them from time to time.

Then, it was assembly time.

HUGE thanks to Ben and Christo at Slee for running taps down my threaded inserts. They are a good product (the inserts), but I do not think the sets for the 80 rod ends are very practical. They warp too easily.

Anyway, all assembled:










Much beefier. These shouldn't bend (I hope)



And, the truck. I gave the T-bar's a couple of turns to level things out just a bit. WAY out of alignment now.



__________________
Isaac

Baby Beast 2- 1999 4Runner SR5

Baby Beast -1987 4Runner SR5-Gone, but not forgotten

Generation Dead
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 08-01-2010, 11:11 PM
Cheese Cheese is offline
Wincher
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Posts: 79
Send a message via AIM to Cheese
Default

And that my friend is why you're the man!

Looking good, I am impressed.
__________________
Adrian Flygt
Sold 4Runner, thanks meth heads.

"There's a feeling I get when I look to the west and my spirit is longing for leaving..."

www.sleeoffroad.com
www.sonoransteel.com
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 08-02-2010, 01:19 AM
Uncle Ben's Avatar
Uncle Ben Uncle Ben is offline
Rising Sun Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Louisville, Colorado
Posts: 13,168
Send a message via AIM to Uncle Ben
Default

Baby Beast is getting beastly! Nice work dude!
__________________
KUBN
Kevin
TLCA #3007
Northside!

Colorado Trail Patrol
Stay on the Trail!
I'm the God-fearing, gun-toting, American flag-waving, conservative you were warned about!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxleIke View Post
I need an FJ40....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Chili View Post
Cruisers are superior
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 08-02-2010, 09:09 AM
RockRunner's Avatar
RockRunner RockRunner is offline
Hard Core 4+
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Roxborough
Posts: 4,406
Default

Looks great, nice job on the design. I do have a question for you, what is the weakest part in your steering set your now? The reason I ask is simple, I have build up my drive train preity stout but I use so so U joints so in case I romp a little to hard the U joint will break but save the rest of your drive train.

PS I really lke the BBQ idea, at first I thought I was looking at knives being made.
__________________
Thanks T aka Tom KR0MPS

Quote:
Originally Posted by RockRunner;
keys = Man that is a whole story


TLCA #6136
Going under the knife again !

85 4runner Marlin Ultimate 5" lift 40" MTR's Soft top and doors Towed to Moab by the Big Blue Whale, 07.5 Dodge Mega Cab Laramie 4" lift covered and chiped No more slow lane for me
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.