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  #1  
Old 02-16-2016, 10:30 PM
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TheHoneyBadger TheHoneyBadger is offline
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Default This is why we don't need diesels...

Because we would be doing this...

https://www.facebook.com/nastytrucks...6794486730456/
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Old 02-19-2016, 11:57 AM
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Old 02-19-2016, 04:29 PM
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Think he's rolling coal on purpose?
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Old 03-13-2017, 06:04 PM
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TacoDane TacoDane is offline
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I love that little 4bt pickup.

I had big aspirations to 4bt my 1500 Ram but never scraped together enough loose change.
The 5.9 that's going in will spice it up though. Was a 5.2 which new is 230hp/295 ftlbs @ 4000rpm. It's getting a rebuilt 5.9 that should push over 250hp/ 350 ftlbs @ 3250rpm or less. The higher power at lower RPMs is crucial with Dodges gearing.
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Old 03-14-2017, 01:34 PM
ForthWheel3r ForthWheel3r is offline
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Lmao what an insane set of tires for donuts.
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:17 PM
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Diesel drivers who are “rolling coal” in Colorado: Tune up or pay up
State lawmakers called practice mean

Diesel pickup truck drivers in Colorado who illegally tweak their engines to blast out black smoke can now be fined $100 for the practice.

By BRUCE FINLEY | bfinley@denverpost.com | The Denver Post
PUBLISHED: May 22, 2017 at 12:53 am | UPDATED: May 22, 2017 at 3:37 pm

Colorado is riding hard on diesel truck drivers who “roll coal,” the politically charged display of power on the roads that has doused other vehicles, such as environmentally friendly Priuses, and pedestrians, including supporters of presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, with sooty black smoke.

Gov. John Hickenlooper this week said he’ll gladly sign into law a bill lawmakers passed that lets police hit offenders with $100 fines.

“Coal rolling is a cruel cut to people with asthma or other respiratory issues,” Hickenlooper said. “We are well to be rid of it.”

Over the past three years, the practice emerged as a way to have fun at the expense of other people, and air quality that is already compromised in parts of Colorado. Diesel pickup truck drivers illegally tweak their engines — tampering with pollution controls and enabling intake of extra fuel — so that by stepping on their accelerator pedals they can blast out spectacularly foul fumes.

New Jersey has outlawed rolling coal.

But Colorado lawmakers, facing anxieties in agricultural areas, wrestled with legislative proposals and twice killed them before passing the bill this month. Police had pushed for a law that could let them crack down. The police occasionally have been targets of the smoke, Fort Collins Police Lt. Craig Horton said.

“We have problems with that display of exhaust, especially on our weekend nights when we have a cruising issue,” Horton said.

Among those embracing the crackdown is Dana TePoel, owner of Lake Arbor Automotive & Truck in Westminster, who for 25 years has conducted state-mandated emissions tests on diesel vehicles for license renewals. Of 52 tests done on diesel vehicles this past week, seven failed.

About a dozen of the trucks that fail emissions tests at his shop each year have engines altered for rolling coal and are usually brought in by drivers new to Colorado.

“We tell ’em they have to fix it,” he said, noting that the modifications can cost thousands of dollars and that coal rollers who fail emissions tests typically must turn back to people who made the illegal modifications to undo them.

TePoel called the $100 fines “a good addition to the system of prevention, emissions testing, that is already in place.”

Trouble hit rolling coal drivers along Colorado’s Front Range when outdoor restaurant patrons and pedestrians complained. Fort Collins police initially tried to use anti-drag racing laws that allow cops to pull over drivers for exhibitions of speed and power, a jailable offense. Police also found it was hard to enforce existing laws prohibiting tampering with pollution control devices.

State Rep. Joann Ginal. D-Fort Collins, was among those smoked. And last fall, when a line of people formed at the New Belgium Brewery to see a campaign event featuring former President Bill Clinton, Ginal said, plume-producing trucks hit them hard.

Hickenlooper’s signature cannot come too soon, she said.

A few days after she and Sen. Don Coram, R-Montrose, secured final passage of the bill, Ginal was driving in Fort Collins behind a tan pickup truck with Texas license plates. The driver smoked her. Ginal said she had a feeling her state lawmaker license plates made her a target.

“They do it to people in Priuses, people on motorcycles, and people just walking down the streets. Some are older people who have chronic respiratory conditions. The smoke makes it worse,” she said.

“It is mean. It is more young people who are doing this,” she said. “They think it is funny.”

It happens statewide, Coram said, citing incidents in Grand Junction and Durango.

A pregnant woman walking with a small child in Durango was hit, said Coram. She called his office to complain. Rolling coal isn’t a matter of political expression, he said.

Ginal introduced legislation in 2016 that died, and tried again this year. Her first bill failed as opponents, including Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg, R-Sterling, a rancher, raised concerns that a crackdown on coal rolling could lead to California-style emission standards for work trucks.

Coram revived the legislation, removing references to harassing behavior — which complicated enforcement — and inserting exceptions for commercial and agricultural vehicles.

Ginal said she expects lawmakers in other states will follow Colorado’s lead.

http://www.denverpost.com/2017/05/22...ng-coal-fines/
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  #7  
Old 05-22-2017, 11:50 PM
J Kimmel J Kimmel is offline
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Thank goodness for more legislation so they'll finally be able to make these bullies pay.

Or they could just ticket them? Surely there is some sort of existing emissions or safety codes an officer can cite when issuing a ticket for excessive smoke.

Yay for more laws
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Old 05-23-2017, 06:41 AM
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DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
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Originally Posted by J Kimmel View Post
Thank goodness for more legislation so they'll finally be able to make these bullies pay.

Or they could just ticket them? Surely there is some sort of existing emissions or safety codes an officer can cite when issuing a ticket for excessive smoke.

Yay for more laws
There exist Federal laws for modifying emissions systems but apparently a cop has to attend a special school to be trained in enforcing those laws. I believe a state trooper could cite you for this but municipal cops aren't going to be qualified (so-to-speak) to enforce them. By making it a state-level vehicle infraction then any cop can cite you. There might be state laws for excessive smoke, not sure about that. But I think the point was to change it from a obscure vehicle emission rule to something more like basically a passive aggressive assault on other drivers and pedestrians.
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Old 05-23-2017, 07:42 AM
J Kimmel J Kimmel is offline
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They've been ticketing people for a while for this in Montrose. There has to be something they're citing rather than just "gosh I wish I could ticket that rude guy for something "
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  #10  
Old 05-23-2017, 08:08 AM
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DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
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They've been ticketing people for a while for this in Montrose. There has to be something they're citing rather than just "gosh I wish I could ticket that rude guy for something "
Maybe defective vehicle, not sure. In the Front Range you can rat on excessively smoking vehicles to a state hotline.

BTW, this article mentions why it's been a difficult thing to enforce.

http://www.coloradoindependent.com/1...-coal-colorado

Quote:
Blowing a cloud of black smoke from the tailpipes of a diesel-engine truck to annoy pedestrians and motorists is called rolling coal, and it’s a cultural pastime among a particular set of individual. The practice is also illegal in Colorado.

The trouble is police have a problem enforcing laws against it, according to law enforcement officers who testified in favor of a bill to help them better regulate what they see as a growing problem.

Currently, for cops to crack down on coal rollers, officers must be trained to discern the opacity of the smoke, and also observe it happening for a full five seconds.

...

Manipulating vehicles to make rolling coal easier has apparently become something of a cottage industry.

“I think we’ve all witnessed and seen the black smoke go up,” said Aurora Democratic Sen. Nancy Todd, at the April 26 hearing.

“Blowing thick black smoke from exhaust pipes is a serious public nuisance,” said Democratic Sen. John Kefalas of Fort Collins.

A Fort Collins police lieutenant testified in favor of the bill, saying, “It can blow up a whole intersection with black smoke in just a few seconds.” That’s why the bill is needed, he said, to help officers who aren’t trained be able to enforce the law and not have to wait a full five seconds before issuing a ticket.

Chris Johnson, who represents the County Sheriffs of Colorado, says the state’s sheriffs back the bill.

“I’ve seen this happen,” he said. “It is an issue.”
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