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Old 03-01-2011, 03:17 PM
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Default Cork Gasket removal?

Hey Guys,
I'm trying to remove an ancient, baked on cork side cover gasket from my late 74 F.5 engine. It is really baked on & I am having trouble. Any tips for the easiest & fastest way to remove it? Would a heat gun help to soften it up?

Also, just how clean does the surface have to be before I put the new one on? Does it really need to be clean & shiney like a mirror?
Thanks,
Abe
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:38 PM
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Maybe not like a mirror but it needs to be really clean unless you don't mind oil leaks. Do you have access to an air compressor? I bought one of the small cut off tool devices and installed a small wire wheel on it. It will clean off a cork side cover gasket in about 5 mintues. You can do it with a wire wheel chucked up in a drill too but they're usually larger and hard to get into the tight spots.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:49 PM
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Yeah those gaskets can turn to glued on cement after a while!

I have a paint scraper that I use for gaskets.. it's a thick narrow one that I have sharpened to almost a razor edge at the end. Once the big stuff is off you can use a razor blade, but be careful! One thing you can do with the razor blade is take a pair of vise grips and clamp the blade in the jaws so it is pointed away from the pliers. then you can whack on it pretty good to peel the gasket off.

Some folks like using wire wheels, but I like to stay away from those on motors since it is hard to tell if you loose a piece of wire in the motor. Also they can sling stuff everywhere. Doing the gasket with a scraper allows you to make sure that you are not loosing any pieces in the motor.

The surface should just be bare metal when you are done... not necessarily shiny just clean of any gasket material.

Before placing the new gasket on, make sure the surface is oil free using brake or carb spray cleaner. Careful with the carb cleaner because it has acetone and will remove paint.

I like to cover the side of the gasket that hits the block with the yellow 3M weatherstrip adhesive. use an even thin coat. also put a coat on the block surface that the gasket will be hitting. Let both dry for a bit per the instructions and stick it into place. I like to use the little side cover bolts to make sure it is lined up to the holes properly. TAKE NOTE OF THE PROPER GASKET ORIENTATION, on my 2F at least the gasket was not symmetrical and would only line up with all the holes one way. If you stick it on wrong, the adhesive will make it a bear to get off again.

Once the gasket is stuck on there and lined up nicely, just slap the side cover on and be sure not to over torque the nuts. Just go by the factory specs and don't be tempted to over do it.

Edit:

Randy says use the wire wheel method, just be careful that you don't loose any pieces of wire. Start with a good new wire wheel.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:52 PM
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Permatex 80646 and a gasket scraper has always worked well for me to remove organic gaskets, although I haven't seen the stuff lately. It's a pretty aggressive solvent, so probably had some now illegal chemicals... Spray it on, let it bubble for about 15 minutes and then scrape the gasket goo off. It leaves bare metal that just needs a wipe with acetone or alcohol to prep for sealing.

Edit to add:
Yup, Permatex no longer lists it. The replacement is 80645, a low VOC version.

http://www.permatex.com/products/Aut...et_Remover.htm
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveInDenver View Post
Permatex 80646 and a gasket scraper has always worked well for me to remove organic gaskets, although I haven't seen the stuff lately. It's a pretty aggressive solvent, so probably had some now illegal chemicals... Spray it on, let it bubble for about 15 minutes and then scrape the gasket goo off. It leaves bare metal that just needs a wipe with acetone or alcohol to prep for sealing.

Edit to add:
Yup, Permatex no longer lists it. The replacement is 80645, a low VOC version.

http://www.permatex.com/products/Aut...et_Remover.htm
I have also hear of folks using oven cleaner...

but that S*** is nasty..
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Old 03-01-2011, 04:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rover67 View Post
I have also hear of folks using oven cleaner...

but that S*** is nasty..
I could see that working like crazy, oven cleaner is primarily lye. But man, I wouldn't want to be trying to spray that stuff laying on my back trying to re-seal an oil pan or something. Holy facial burns Batman! The Permatex stuff is a variant similar to Dow's EstasolTM
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Old 03-01-2011, 04:26 PM
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I had good success using Randy's wire wheel on my old oil pan gasket. My trick is to use the paint scraper method to remove as much material as possible and then take the wire wheel to whatever is left. Its much more efficient to remove the old stuff with a scraper in chunks, but at some point you'll just scraping small shavings anyways, and the wire wheel will do that quicker.
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Old 03-01-2011, 04:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theboomboom View Post
I had good success using Randy's wire wheel on my old oil pan gasket. My trick is to use the paint scraper method to remove as much material as possible and then take the wire wheel to whatever is left. Its much more efficient to remove the old stuff with a scraper in chunks, but at some point you'll just scraping small shavings anyways, and the wire wheel will do that quicker.
Exactly, then just make sure you clean everything up really good. I've used the wire wheel method for years without a problem. Clean everything then run a magnet over the surface if you're really worried.
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Old 03-01-2011, 05:06 PM
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I would concur with the scrape off the big chunks first and follow-up with the wire wheel approach, followed by brake cleaner. It works very well.
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Old 03-01-2011, 05:26 PM
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All the advice so far is great. To reinforce the 'gasket scraper' comment:

I bought a thick putty knife/gasket scraper years ago, and I carefully sharpen it on a bastard file so that it has a very true, sharp edge. Sharpen it on this file before each use. It ends up working like a beefy razor blade and really works well on cast iron, which doesn't gouge easily. You have to use more care on aluminum.

O'Reillys (Checker Auto) had some nice scrapers the other day, including an offset one. They were $6.99 or so and were quite thick and beefy. You don't want a flexible putty knife - at least not for the truly nasty stuck-on gasket material.
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