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Old 08-22-2011, 10:15 PM
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Rezarf Rezarf is offline
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Default What would you do? Contractor work...

We are getting new appliances in our new place this week and we are installing a gas stove. We needed to run a gas line so I hired a guy to do the work. I wasn't afraid of it, but I thought we would have peace of mind of a pro doing the work... not to mention we have had some big changes this week as well. ()

So today, the plumber drops by (we had agreed to talk yesterday about when he would come, but he didn't call) today and my folks were there. So, he got started and finished the work. My dad calls and asked "what exactly did you two discuss" about the job. Not good.

I get home tonight to find the job kinda slapped together. A big hole in the sheet rock, with the piece just put back in place where the outlet comes into the kitchen (no biggie). He used the hole to drill through the joist to gain access to the basement. He used flex line, no biggie. But there is a splice in the middle of it with an obviously used section running to the main line and some new line running into the kitchen. He didn't instal a shut off valve at the main, but he left one for the end at the appliance, unattached. The gas hose/line is hanging down below the joists and routed ontop of the duct work to "hang" it.

As far as I know, he didn't pull any kind of permit.

All in all, the work is about a 5 on a scale of 10 for attention to detail. I am assuming it is safe but my dad says he was using water and soap to find any leaks... seriously? There isn't a gas reading meter for this kind of work?

Anyhow, I have never hired a contractor before. I would like to see:
A valve installed at the main line.
A single hose without an additional (and unnecessary) coupling in it.
The sheet rock at least remudded.
A leak check done with a proper tool.

Am I way out of line? Just looking for some advice. Its the one job I thought I'd gain peace of mind over doing it myself... it is after all flamable gas. Now I am guessing the whole job as the parts I can see are subpar.

What would you do?

off
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Old 08-22-2011, 11:00 PM
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Oh that sounds frustrating. And like a piss-poor job. I know a guy who has done work on my house. He's not a plumber, but does just about anything and is very reliable and trustworthy. Art Jacobson. 720-319-1120 cell. Might be worth a call. I re-piped my whole house myself, though. It's not hard and like with Land Cruiser work, then you know it has been done with attention to detail. Been good for about 10 years now. Whatever you do, good luck.
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Old 08-22-2011, 11:27 PM
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sounds like a piss poor job, id have it compleatlly redone, or just inspected, if you get cought w/o a permit in the future there "can" be large fees to pay, and haveing to redo it properlly.. providing there is even a permit required for this job.
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Old 08-23-2011, 06:06 AM
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DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
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In Denver you don't need a permit for plumbing repairs, but this probably would not qualify being a new outlet. Likely a permit is required to be legal. Call the building code office and ask. They'll want to know the contractor's license number.

The soap test is a valid leak test and is fine. They do make leak sniffers and a good plumber would have one, but most would spray the leak detection soap and let it sit while they are cleaning up and check for bubbles after a few minutes. Believe it or not, the simple, cheap way has been a reliable way to check for leaks forever.

The drywall hole and lack of repair is unprofessional without doubt.

Without seeing the work, can't say the run sounds good. Tapping a line for a branch takes work and he does sound lazy. The only flex should be between the appliance and the shut off at your wall, which should be installed and have a flare fitting. Everything between the shut off and your meter should be hard pipe, especially if it's behind a wall or running through joists. The shut off should be at the appliance.
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Old 08-23-2011, 06:17 AM
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likely the person is not licensed, or if they are, just not concerned. it's really very simple. unfortunately, you will be paying to have it done twice.

been there.
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Old 08-23-2011, 08:50 AM
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I think Dave in Denver has it right, but you technically do need a permit for gas work, and it has to pass a leak-down test. Leaving the big hole in the sheet rock allows for your heated house air to pass more easily up to the attic, so patching that correctly would be wise. I have seen what you're describing - the installer just leans the big hunk of cut out drywall back against the wall, behind the stove, but that's completely mickey mouse. The drywall may have to be left out for inspection purposes, but should be buttoned up neatly when finished.
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Old 08-23-2011, 08:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveInDenver View Post
The drywall hole and lack of repair is unprofessional without doubt.

Tapping a line for a branch takes work and he does sound lazy. The only flex should be between the appliance and the shut off at your wall, which should be installed and have a flare fitting. Everything between the shut off and your meter should be hard pipe, especially if it's behind a wall or running through joists. The shut off should be at the appliance.
agree 100%
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
The drywall may have to be left out for inspection purposes, but should be buttoned up neatly when finished.
Absolutely, if he had a permit it would have to be left open for inspection. Should be clear, to do this he would've had to cut an opening the wall and so that's not surprising. Whether or not he'd fix it is also sorta up to the contractor and what you negotiate. You hired him to do the plumbing and the incidental work might or might not be his problem. I've had plumbers ask that I expose the area where the work is to be done just to avoid this grey area, you cut it open and close it. Some might make sure it's OK to demo as necessary, but are clear that they don't do repairs (often their brother-in-law happens to be a drywall contractor, LOL!). It's important to discuss this up front.
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:24 AM
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I would pull a personal permit and then call the inspector to come out and inspect it. Whatever he finds, you can MAKE the contractor meet that inspection finding. Not to mention, you are gonna want this inspection signed off in case, heaven forbid, there is any failure in the future. Otherwise, your insurance will not cover the loss.

I'm jobless right now and willing to take a look at it if you want...I'm right down the street from your new house. Lemme know.

P
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