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Old 04-17-2013, 11:57 PM
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Default Trailer chains

I want to come up with a better solution for the trailer chains on our pop-up (2500lbs). The current chains are too short, too small, and attached with a single small bolt. If I ever had a coupler failure a chain failure would only follow almost instantly

Pic below is my M101a set up. I like this and want to do something similar. Any ideas on how to duplicate the chain connections to the trailer frame.
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Old 04-18-2013, 12:00 AM
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Visited a few places today looking for ideas. At Fastenal I came up with these two possible solutions. Bolt these on, one on each side, through frame rail of trailer. Then use chain same set up as M101a pictured above
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Old 04-18-2013, 12:03 AM
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Next up, basically a small u-bolt. Again drill through frame rail and use one on each side. I would not need to use the threaded connector links with these. Just loop a chain ling through.
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Old 04-18-2013, 12:06 AM
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interesting little piece of hardware here. But I could not find a clevis or similar item to connect through the hole. These did not have any strength rating on them but looked plenty strong for the task. Definitely a step forward over the stock chains anyway.
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Old 04-18-2013, 12:10 AM
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I'm going to do some web searching to see what else I can find. But any thoughts or ideas are welcomed.
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Old 04-18-2013, 07:36 AM
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The piece of hardware in your last photo is called a shouldered lower link pin. Those are the pins used on tractor 3-point hitches, so a farm supply will have all sorts of them in different sizes. Something to think about is the these fit into a ball at the end of the lower link bars and that little hole is to hold a lynch pin, not really designed to see much force. I wouldn't trust it for safety connection if you bolt through the eye.

You can kinda see how they work here, lower left of the photo.



The first photo is what's called an eye nut. It's designed as a lifting point, so they are rated for a roughly similar use. If you back that with a grade 8 bolt with a thick washer it should be safe. Rating depends on size, but a 1/2" heavy duty steel carries a WLL of 3,600 lbs and a 5/8 a WLL of 5,800 lbs. Bear in mind that weight is along its axis with the bolt in tension, if you rotate the load to put the bolt in shear it might be different.

What might be better is a swiveling hoist eye, similar to the lifting eye nut but can move through a range of motion. Added complexity and cost, but the rating remains the same regardless of how you load it.



You could just use a standard shoulder eye bolt (or sometimes referred to as a turnbuckle eye bolt).



Or the various tie-down tabs.



How about bolting or welding on a swivel tab.

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Old 04-18-2013, 08:03 AM
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How about a variation on an engine lifting plate?



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Old 04-18-2013, 08:25 AM
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I like the hoist ring idea and thought of that, but too much money. I think I'm liking the wire rope clamp idea the most, as I can eliminate the threaded link which is a weak point in the system. I did find some that were forged and not malleable. Not sure if that part applies to the u-bolt section and it it would even matter?

5/16" chain, grade 70 is the size I'll probably use as it will work well with some gated hooks I found for the vehicle side. Maybe I'm just completely over thinking this and should just bolt the chain on with a grade 8 and big washer? I have a tendency to do that sometimes.

Threaded link I don't want to use if possible.
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Old 04-18-2013, 08:38 AM
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This is the factory setup on my car hauler
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Last edited by gahi; 04-18-2013 at 09:23 AM.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:03 AM
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Gary, is that the way the OEM made it? In that configuration those lynch pins are fuses.

Instead of cannibalizing a rope clamp what about just using a u-bolt. You can get those graded AFAIK.

They do make chain bolt for bolting a link directly, I'd check with trailer and boating places.



If I was you I'd probably just weld (or maybe bolt and weld) an eye to the trailer frame.

Maybe like this:



Then use a chain shackle to connect the chains to it. I don't trust those quick links and these are supposed to be /safety/ chains afterall.

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