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  #11  
Old 09-27-2012, 02:19 PM
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DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
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Bike sizing is a bit of art and bit of black magic. You need to know basically your height and real inseam, this is your inseam barefoot from the ground to your junk and is usually a couple of inches longer than your pants inseam. It sounds odd (and what about cycling doesn't really), but you stand with your back to the wall, feet a few inches apart and bring a paperback book just until it touches your crouch. The distance from the top of the book to the ground is your real inseam. Your torso length and arm length will also factor into the right size. There is actually a pseudo-medical term for it, pubic bone height and you'll sometimes see people refer to the PBH, which is carry-over from the Fit Kit (the tool bike shops use to fit you) terms.

I am 6'0", 35.5" inseam (I wear 34" pants usually), pretty typical reach. I ride a 58cm road bike and usually large MTB, which tends to be 19"~20". I like a bike with a around a 24.5" top tube length and look for no less than 32~33" stand over for a MTB or CX (it's often more than that, standover more like 31" or 32"). I tend to have around a 90mm stem with 5 degree of rise, 20mm of spacers.

But the magic part is that almost all bikes now have sloping top tubes, so their actual measurement is not their sizing measurement. Going way, way back the center of the bottom bracket to the top tube was typically how a bike was measured since they had flat top tubes. Some times the measurement was to the middle of the TT and sometimes to the top of the TT. Occasionally it was to the top of the seat collar. Now when the TT slopes, the BB to TT might measure something like 55cm on a 58cm size frame.

Confused?

The effective seat tube length is the term they use now, since the BB to TT length is virtual. It is measured using a level held at the top tube and head tube junction to find a point on the seatpost that translates to the old 'flat' to tube point. Then measure from that point to the BB to find the sizing seat tube length.



A 22" frame would be much too tall for you. I think a 56cm might be on the small side of fitting you, but it might be uncomfortably short. You tweak the fit with stem length, stem height and saddle position mostly, but if a frame is too small or large it's hard to fit. From your description I'd think 56, 57 and maybe 58 should be on your radar or 17, 18 or 19". They use metric for road bikes and cyclocross, imperial for MTBs. Just tradition. In any case they might also be marked medium or large depending on the manufacturer. I ride large frames and sometimes XL, but I don't like being cranked at all.
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  #12  
Old 09-27-2012, 02:33 PM
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Ah! Okay. Well, that makes a ton more sense, and makes things a lot easier online! LOL. Here I thought I must need some freakishly weird frame size by just doing the conversion.

Good to know!

One further question: What are the ups and downs of an internal hub type gear set in the back? Usually these are like 7 speeds. In terms of getting beat on while under/infront of the bus, it seems like a sealed unit could be good.

Are they prone to es-plode-ing?
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  #13  
Old 09-27-2012, 02:43 PM
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Nope, you are right smack dab in the average height, average size. It's personal preference if you want something a little larger or smaller than average, but 75% of bike out there are made to fit you.

For commuters internally gear hubs are cool. Downsides is mostly cost and weight. Here in Colorado it's not really necessary but commuters in Seattle, Pittsburgh and what-not like them because they are much better in slop. With fenders here you are covered for the occasional splash.

My experience is that what wears down components and bikes is winter commuters with mag-chloride, that stuff destroys your bike. So the cool setup is internal geared hub and belt drives, virtually nothing to hurt and you can wash it down with very little ill effect.

But unless you really need the weather resistance (and we don't), the fairly limited gear range, specificity of the frame (it needs slightly different mounts) I think don't make them necessary. One up side is being planetary gears they shift with you sitting still. This is actually pretty handy in traffic, so you don't have to downshift until after you've stopped.
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  #14  
Old 09-27-2012, 02:54 PM
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[quote=AxleIke;219246]Hmm...Perhaps my perception of components has been colored by my MTB background. On the MTBs, I had brand new, fresh from the shop, but low end components jump gears, etc...So, on my latest bike, I bought one step below top of the line and couldn't be happier. /QUOTE]

Well you are correct for a "purpose specific" bike, exception being the "commuter purpose specific" bike. It's the same as trucks, you can buy a 4 wheel drive truck off the lot and hit the hills - but if you really want to wheel then components begin to matter. For a commuter bike, sure it will be nicer with high end components - but there is a butload of Civics and Corollas out there that have hundreds of thousands of miles with the stereo being the only upgraded component. The key is keeping things clean and maintained.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AxleIke View Post
I don't know how to tune a bike, I've always just taken it to a shop. Guess I better get a book and figure out how to do it. I disagree that working on bikes is easier than cars. But, thats a matter of perspective.
If you start to get into it, you'll soon find out it is much easier than working on cars.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AxleIke View Post
... I am not a fan of backpacks for longer rides. They cause major neck and back ache for me (I carry a laptop, plus text books, plus other BS), and I'd need a huge pack to carry all that plus clothes, towel, and toilet kit for showering. I agree that the Paniers seem to be a PITA for the bike side, but they seem to come with shoulder straps now, so hopefully it won't be horribly cumbersome. My boss has them, and they seem pretty quick, just snap on and off of the rack. ...
I currently use panniers, but early on I threw everything in a wet dry bag, a couple of bungies to secure it to the rack worked just fine.
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  #15  
Old 09-27-2012, 07:14 PM
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I have a Nishiki that I posted up here a few months ago. I haven't done anything with it. You can have it for a six pack of something hoppy.
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  #16  
Old 09-27-2012, 08:13 PM
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$500 and get a specialized work 2 or something similar
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  #17  
Old 09-27-2012, 11:01 PM
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Here's my ultracheap bike if you want it.
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  #18  
Old 09-27-2012, 11:54 PM
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Matt, I'd be very interested if its the right size. I currently have my dads old Easton KHS full suspension straight out of the 90s. It gets be to the bus and back, but is too small, and uncomfortable to ride. I need to get something bigger if I'm going to make the longer ride work.
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  #19  
Old 09-28-2012, 02:33 PM
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kiss dude, kiss
KEEP IT SIMPLE STU..

you get the idea. ANY road frame will do. Really. A cross frame, even better. Your looking at 2-3 bills in components to build a commuter, all in. I have built 3 in the last 2 years.

If you can find a cross bike, that's what you want. 700c wheels for speed, triple crank, v or canti brakes, and braze ons for everything (racks - etc) By a set of ritchey commuters, (the ones with the reflective stripe) and go

do get stuck on frame size either. Try every bike. I am almost 6'3", but I only have a 34" inseam, yet I ride a 60cm with an oversized top tube on the road. I have fit some 58's, and even many 63's.

Kiss dude, kiss
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  #20  
Old 09-30-2012, 03:17 PM
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^ that looks like a good deal. Install rack and fenders, smooth tires and you're all set.
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