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  #21  
Old 01-23-2009, 01:33 PM
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Groucho Groucho is offline
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Originally Posted by RicardoJM View Post
I ran the power direct to the battery.
I suppose you could tap into the fuse panel.
One of the questions for the general exam is "Where should the radio be wired from, the battery or the vehicles fuse panel?"

The correct answer is: Directly to the battery.

While the very casual user may see no problems arise from hooking their radio to the cigarette lighter/aux power outlet, in general the accepted safe practice is to wire the radio directly to the battery (or secondary fuse block, as long as said fuse block is wired for the correct current draw of all the appliances connected to it). Keep in mind that some of these radios use upwards of 30A draw when in transmit mode. Even the ARB 32Q freezer/fridge (which may connect to the cig lighter) draws 7A constant load!

Don't try and make sense of "My CB radio was alright hooking to the vehicles fuse block, so my HAM radio will be as well." The maximum legal output of a commercially sold CB radio is 5 watts. Most of our 2M radios are between 50 and 75 watts, and the all mode (HF, VHF, UHF) radios can come ready to give 100 watts power. Maybe Dave can give us the equation for current draw at 12V and 50W power. I guarantee that the vehicles fuse block does not have any spare openings rated to the numbers you will find.

The reason this is bad for us is because too many garage mechanics half-a$* our wiring, leading to a spaghetti mess under our seats and our hood. Not only does this promote problems, it also can lead to unsafe things happening like engine fires and short circuits. I had a negative battery cable fall off of a VW and it treated the battery as a fuseable link and fried it. The battery was GONE. Melted the insides like cheese in the microwave. The idea is that if general practice is to wire everything to the battery, less problems caused by wiring messes and less chance of unsafe things happening. Ultimately, it will encourage us to be btter at our "spaghetti mess" and become more professional with our installations.
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  #22  
Old 01-23-2009, 01:55 PM
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  #23  
Old 01-23-2009, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Groucho View Post
Maybe Dave can give us the equation for current draw at 12V and 50W power.
This is a tech test question...

BTW, another reason to wire straight to the battery with both leads is noise immunity. If both positive and negative cables are run together and to the same power source, any EMI noise will create the same level of interference on both wires and that can be filtered easier. That's called common mode noise because it's common to both leads.
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  #24  
Old 01-23-2009, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveInDenver View Post
This is a tech test question...

BTW, another reason to wire straight to the battery with both leads is noise immunity. If both positive and negative cables are run together and to the same power source, any EMI noise will create the same level of interference on both wires and that can be filtered easier. That's called common mode noise because it's common to both leads.

This is a debatable decision... Theoretically it reduces noise. Some HAM manufacturers intend for you to do this, and include fuses on the negative lead.

I think with "modern (made in the last 5 years)" radios it is not needed. If your charging system is up to the task and your engine grounds are good.

There is a theory that without fusing the negative you provide a method for short to travel through the radio.

The "experts" at Motorola do not want you to take the negative lead to the battery.... and that is what I go by... I have well into the multiple hundreds of radio installs done in everything from Harleys, Crown Vics, up to Oshkosh plow trucks... and I do them all the same. Even from the factory prewires from International Truck, the negative is just to chassis.

The quality of an newer Yaesu, Icom, Kenwood matches there commercial stuff, heck they are the same radio.

The Motorola, Tait, MA/COM, BK stuff is in a different league (and price range)

I am not supplied with the proper stuff to do installs. On the radios that are not provided with ignition sense capabilities, I really should be running radios off a relay that uses a key on ignition sense.... But as a HAM you probably are not worried about ignition sense...

I have tapped the "hot" side of mini atm fuses for a lot of radios... Typically they are 35-50 watt VHF radios... I use these




I know it ain't right.... but they aren't my vehicles... But nothing has caught fire yet

Here is some of my work:

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  #25  
Old 01-23-2009, 11:35 PM
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There's another reason to bypass any key switched connections -- so you can talk on your radio or monitor the local chatter while your rig is off and you're having lunch.

I installed an aux. fuse block that goes direct to the battery, and hooked my 7800 to that. You're going to be installing more stuff in the future: being in a club with Nakman virtually guarantees that. Might as well be prepared.
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  #26  
Old 01-29-2009, 04:54 PM
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I've been researching and the yaesu 7800 looks like the way to go. I like the idea of the faceplate being mountable separatly. dual band I don't quite understand yet? but I bet I will shortly after my HAM book arrives and I attend some classes next month. Reviews seem to be better than for the 2800 and 1802. there seem to be complaints about the mic on both models and I assume the mic is different for the 7800. Looks like they can be found for $230. Anything to watch out for or venders to avoid? Now I got to learn about antennas. I don't need anything as big as Nathaniel's.
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  #27  
Old 01-29-2009, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by farnhamstj View Post
... dual band I don't quite understand yet? ...
Dual band means you can listen to two channels at once. A dual band like the 8800 is almost like having two separate radios, hard wired together. So you've got the Vail repeater (Colorado Connection) on one, then the 146.460 simplex group you're running with on the other. You're in contact with the group on the trail, also listening for your friend who's running late. That's just one of the many ways to use dual band.. another is using your truck as a base station to cross band repeat, so you can be walking or sitting around with an HT yet communicate through the better rig in the truck. Or in Moab you'll have your trail run on one channel, and can monitor another trail on the other, or even scan all of them on the other channel.

When I drive around in Denver, I'll usually have 145.145 on one channel and 146.460 on the other, those being our most popular I'm bound to catch whomever else is out there. Or pop over to the weather channel on the second band for a minute or two during a run, just for grins.. lots of ways to use a dual band radio, no you don't need it but it sure is cool and I'm very glad I got one, and don't know anyone here who also has one who regrets the purchase.
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  #28  
Old 01-29-2009, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by farnhamstj View Post
I've been researching and the yaesu 7800 looks like the way to go. I like the idea of the faceplate being mountable separatly. dual band I don't quite understand yet?
The 7800 is not a true dual band like the 8800. The 7800 is dual band in the sense that it can receive/transmit on two bands ( 2 meter and 70 centimeter).The 8800 is a true dual band you can listen to two different frequencies at the same time ( two radios in one right side left side) same bands as the 7800. Hope that makes sense? If you decide on the 7800 give me a shout I may have one for sale. It would include the remote mounting kit and software ( cable required)
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  #29  
Old 01-29-2009, 06:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Convert View Post
The 7800 is not a true dual band like the 8800. The 7800 is dual band in the sense that it can receive/transmit on two bands ( 2 meter and 70 centimeter).The 8800 is a true dual band you can listen to two different frequencies at the same time ( two radios in one right side left side) same bands as the 7800. Hope that makes sense? If you decide on the 7800 give me a shout I may have one for sale. It would include the remote mounting kit and software ( cable required)
2nds on the "7800 maybe." 40's gonna need some ears!
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  #30  
Old 01-29-2009, 06:42 PM
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convert you have a pm
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