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  #11  
Old 02-06-2009, 12:07 PM
J Kimmel J Kimmel is offline
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might take you up on that. Question though, why do the bearings not like the oil? Seems they would but, I dunno. I will say for certain though I am pretty positive they are leaking, as the backing plates are damp, and the brakes work great so it isn't a wheel cylinder.


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Originally Posted by Red_Chili View Post
You sure those are tapered rollers? Wouldn't that require some preload?

FWIW, ball bearings are a fine application for rear axle bearings, but they sure don't like leaky axle seals. Neither do brakes.

To change them you need some sort of jig and (I would recommend) a 20-ton press. I was successful using my 12 ton HF press, ONCE, but SeldomSeen discovered its limits with his. No problem, I was able to weld it back together...


I have most of what you need made out of an old axle. You may borrow it for a sixpack or something, as long as the jig has attached to it a satellite tracking system guaranteeing it makes it back to me.
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  #12  
Old 02-06-2009, 12:21 PM
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DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
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You sure those are tapered rollers? Wouldn't that require some preload?
Duh, I'm thinking of the front. I understand that the Tacoma doesn't use tapered roller bearings at all, right?

My mind is mush today, although I did figure out something cool this morning. How to parse strings from a VHDL component's stim file (the component is just an ugly hacked together op code processor that runs my script of commands) and echo it into my Questasim simulation. That makes me happy cause I can add keyword comments that I can use to search through the 100,000 friggin' lines of high-Z and resolved to 'X' warnings in the log file. I'm such a dork. It popped into my mind how to do it at about 3AM and I never got back to sleep, so I got into work really early this morning.
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  #13  
Old 02-06-2009, 12:54 PM
SteveH SteveH is offline
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The '98 is a 3rd gen (according to my understanding of generations). Replacing the rear rear wheel bearing involved (with my buddy at the dealer) removing the axle, and cutting off the ABS sensor and a few assorted press-on rings and spacers. You can technically remove these pieces on a press, but the dealer guy cuts them off carefully with a die grinder, to not nick the axle. It's very tough to set up the press to press off these pieces without damaging them or the axle. Obviously, he's not paying for the parts, either. Afterall this is off, you can press off the wheel bearing. It required some press skill, so I don't recommend this to someone with a bench vise in their garage.

Total parts price was $150 for a new bearing, spacers, ABS ring, oil seals, etc. I think this bearing is not lubricated by axle oil, because there's an oil seal on both sides. I have the defective bearing, and this ball bearing is quite loose and noisy as you spin it in your hand. The cage holds the ball bearings quite far apart, so that only a few bearings at a time are bearing the vehicle weight - hence my opinion of a poor design.

The way mine failed is that I was returning from a 4000 mile vacation and last 250 miles, I hear a 'bad bearing' sound. Driving 80 with a 200# camper may not have helped. Upon putting the truck on a lift and putting it in gear and letting the rear wheels spin, it was very obvious by sight and sound that the LR wheel bearing was shot. I did not replace the RR bearing and we'll see how long that one lasts. If it were cheaper/easier, I would have done them both, but hey, the truck could be totalled by some idiot tomorrow, too.

I did not investigate (but should have) if the ID/OD of the 1st gen tapered bearing were the same. If so, you might be able to retrofit a 3rd gen axle with tapered roller 1st gen bearings. This would be a nifty upgrade.

Final note - I never had any oil leakage with this bearing failure, so by catching it early, it saved buying a set of brake shoes (which are typically contaminated by gear oil during a bearing or seal failure).

Steve
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  #14  
Old 02-06-2009, 12:57 PM
SteveH SteveH is offline
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Correction to posting #13 per the earlier comment - 1st gen rear axle roller bearings are straight, not tapered. My mistake.
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  #15  
Old 02-06-2009, 01:03 PM
J Kimmel J Kimmel is offline
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sounds like a disaster...hope mine is better than that, we shall see.
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  #16  
Old 02-06-2009, 02:19 PM
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Red_Chili Red_Chili is offline
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I dunno, I regularly hear of 200K successful miles on 3rd gens, and 150K failures on 1st and 2nd gens. Luck of the draw IMHO. FWIW all my motorcycles use sealed balls too, and there are some serious side loads on them. Not sure I'd call them junk, but Robbie or BVB or someone could speak with more authority.

Yeah, they hate gear oil. Gear oil from leaky axle seals washes past the bearing seals and carries in grit, washes out grease. Dead in short order.

You are right on the front bearings Dave. No more tapered rollers.

Of course the Chili no longer sports ball OR roller bearings in the rear. Tapered 4 corners baby. Name:  deal.gif
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AFAIK the older and newer bearings are identically sized. I had no idea there was a difference. I might just have to pull a seal on the new ones in my garage and have a lookeesee.
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  #17  
Old 02-06-2009, 02:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Chili View Post
I dunno, I regularly hear of 200K successful miles on 3rd gens, and 150K failures on 1st and 2nd gens. Luck of the draw IMHO.
I agree, normal manufacturing variance like anything. Just that Koyo bearings generally have less part-to-part variance IME. I'm at 207K on my original rears and have been kicking around doing the R&R just 'cause this summer since the truck's been noisier going down the highway since Rubithon (haven't isolated it to tranny, xfer, tires, just a lowish hum that I can't quite convince myself is the M/Ts). I might just be jinxing myself.
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  #18  
Old 02-06-2009, 03:14 PM
J Kimmel J Kimmel is offline
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well I will jack it up this weekend and see. If it is the bearings I think I will gather the parts and just pull the whole assembly out and tear down to R&R it.
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  #19  
Old 02-07-2009, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveInDenver View Post
I agree, normal manufacturing variance like anything. Just that Koyo bearings generally have less part-to-part variance IME. I'm at 207K on my original rears and have been kicking around doing the R&R just 'cause this summer since the truck's been noisier going down the highway since Rubithon (haven't isolated it to tranny, xfer, tires, just a lowish hum that I can't quite convince myself is the M/Ts). I might just be jinxing myself.
If you are at 207K on your original gears as well, or close to it, you might consider pulling the diff and checking the carrier bearing preload too.

http://www.gearinstalls.com
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  #20  
Old 02-07-2009, 01:27 PM
J Kimmel J Kimmel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Chili View Post
If you are at 207K on your original gears as well, or close to it, you might consider pulling the diff and checking the carrier bearing preload too.

http://www.gearinstalls.com

I think once the weather is nice I am going to pull the entire axle and go through it top to bottom. With 212K on the clock it doesn't seem like a bad idea
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