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  #21  
Old 03-29-2009, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by farnhamstj View Post
Very nice write up. What's up with the 2"x4" tube welded to the front cross member? behind the front bumper. Looks like something from Thomas the Train? Fishing rod carrier? Beer holder? Old plow mount?
Might be the perfect Birfield separator tool.
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  #22  
Old 03-30-2009, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by farnhamstj View Post
Very nice write up. What's up with the 2"x4" tube welded to the front cross member? behind the front bumper. Looks like something from Thomas the Train? Fishing rod carrier? Beer holder? Old plow mount?
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Originally Posted by Shark Bait View Post
Might be the perfect Birfield separator tool.
Any or none of the above, its a PO mystery.
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  #23  
Old 05-06-2009, 07:45 PM
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Default Power Steering Pump to box lines

Ok, back to posting about the conversion work, over the next couple of days Ill be adding to this thread with some of the technical details about my conversion.

The low pressure return fitting that I picked up at the junk yard came straight up from the power steering box and was in between the oil filter lines. I trimmed the fitting enough for the hose to be attached and gently bent in the direction of the power steering pump. In this picture you can see how close the fitment is. Just use your x-ray vision to see through the coil of brake lines.


Junk yard parts tip; the low pressure fitting clamps in the Toyota trucks are a great item to pick up in the junk yard. I found these clamps to be easier to work with than band clamps.

Despite all my words of wisdom about switching to a new power steering pump, I ended up keeping my junk yard Volvo pump. I made a custom power steering hose by starting with an FJ60 power steering hose from NAPA, part # NPS72142. I removed the connector fitting from my Volvo pump removed the connector fitting from the FJ60 hose. Here is a picture of the fitting screwed into the Volvo pump just cut the tube and the fitting is free:


I then took the Volvo connector and FJ60 hose to an auto shop and asked them put a double flare with the Volvo fitting. This was a bit risky because the Volvo tube was SAE and FJ60 tube was metric - close to the same diameters but the SAE was just a tad larger. Things got a bit riskier as the auto shop had double flare tool for SAE tubing and not metric tubing. In my case it all worked out. The connection is strong and does not leak. If you do go this route YMMV. Here is a close up picture of the hose connections on the Volvo pump:


I did not install a cooling coil on the low pressure return line.
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  #24  
Old 05-06-2009, 08:22 PM
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Default Alternator Relocation Issues

I had a few issues come up with my alternator relocation work; pulley alignment, let the smoke out of a wire and no headlights.

First, no headlights; when relocating the alternator I split up a splice of ground wires. I made the assumption that each of the ground wires were attached to ground and that by separating them I was "cleaning up" my wiring, this was a bas assumption. My mistake here could have been avoided if I had done some testing on the ground wires to confirm where each one went. Failing this I could have found my problem sooner if I had checked the function of my lights right after completing the wiring changes. I didn't do either of these things so I did not find my headlight trouble until after I had buttoned everything up. The picture quality is not very good, but here is the splice of ground wires that I split up:


Here is what my nice, neat splices looked like after I was done with the split.


It turns out that in splitting up the splice of ground wires I removed the ground portion of my head light circuit. A circuit is not a circuit unless it is complete and has a ground. MtnTrucker helped me through the de-bugging process to find the problem and getting it fixed.


Second, let the smoke out of the wire; when adjusting the alternator tension my wrench slipped from my hand and made contact with a post on the alternator. This resulted in a short and in quick order the white wire to my ammeter heated up and burned through. My battery had been disconnected for weeks while I worked on the conversion and within 10 minutes of be being connected the mishap occurred. The needle fell off my ammeter from the ordeal so after replacing the white wire I had to manually check and confirm the voltage at the battery to make sure it is charging. I've found a new ammeter and will be installing it this week. The lesson here is clear; always disconnect the battery no matter how simple the electrical system work may seem to be. Here is a picture I snapped just after letting the smoke out. Do not give yourself the chance to take a similar picture.


Third, pulley alignment; when using my existing alternator the pulley alignment was not perfect. My existing alternator is a reman that I purchased last summer. As a reman the original pulley had been replaced with something smaller than OEM. When installing it originally it needed some shimming to get it aligned. When moved over the passenger side and placed into the 2F bracket there is very little shimming that could be done and it would not line up as needed. To get through this issue, I took an OEM alternator from my parts stash in the garage to D and D Auto Electric. This alternator had the larger pulley. I could have just swapped pulleys between the two but being that I did not have the correct sized nut to remove the pulley I took the more expensive route.

While not really an issue, I really overcomplicated the rewiring process. If I were to do this again, I would have routed the wires directly to the new alternator location, i.e. up and over the valve cover versus routing them across the fire wall and around the passenger side fender.
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  #25  
Old 05-07-2009, 07:56 AM
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I also like to put wire bundles into split loom tube versus wrapping everything in tape. Makes it a lot easier when trouble shooting, adding new wires for accessories and it doesnt trap water.
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  #26  
Old 05-09-2009, 07:54 AM
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Default Belts

The belts for the alternator and power steering pump were purchased at NAPA. I measured the length for each at the closest and farthest adjustment points to get an idea of the range. For the alternator I had a few inches of range and the power steering pump it was just shy of 2 inches. It took a few trips to and from NAPA to get my belt nailed down. In retrospect, it would have saved time to have started out with buying several belts in on shot, take them home to determine which was the best fit and then returning the others.

The belt width for wide pulleys is 17mm. The part number for the power steering pump belt is 25 22443. The part number for the alternator belt is 25 22485. Here is a photo of the steering pump belt.


Working with the belts is much easier when the radiator and radiator shrouds are not in place.
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  #27  
Old 05-09-2009, 08:33 AM
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Default Removing the Steering Wheel

In order to be able to remove the steering column and shaft, the steering wheel needs to come off. The first step in removing the steering wheel is to pop off the horn cover. Mine is loose enough that I can grab it by the edges and just pop it off. With the horn cover off, you are looking at this.


The nut in the center needs to be removed. It is 17mm. With the nut out you can remove the disk with the tabs. You are then looking at a plate with a black plastic circle. This plate will need to be popped out so that the holes used to pull the steering wheel can be exposed. Here is what it looks like.


A bit of side story is in order here, in my case, this black plastic circle had become brittle over the years and when putting the plate back in, the black plastic circle crumbled and disintegrated. The black plastic circle is a spacer that keeps the horn circuit open. Without it, the horn circuit will be complete and the horn will be always on. To correct this, I used a few layers of electrical tape in place of the black plastic spacer. It works just fine for now, but I'm wondering how it will hold up in the summer heat.

The spring for the horn brush is the bright silver piece at the top. From my research, the horn brush and spring are getting to be as scarce as hens teeth, so keep an eye on yours.


Once the horn brush and spring are removed the steering wheel is ready for the puller. Using the puller is very straight forward and in short order the wheel is off and here is what it looks like.


Next steps are to disconnect the turn signal lever, remove the turn signal lever bracket and disconnect the wire for the horn where it leaves the steering column. While not required, I did remove the top bushing from the steering column. Here is what things look like when all the work above is done.


The only thing left to do in the cab to free up the steering column and steering shaft from being removed is to remove the bracket on the bottom of the dash that holds the steering column in place. No pictures of that part of the process.
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  #28  
Old 05-09-2009, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnTrucker View Post
I also like to put wire bundles into split loom tube versus wrapping everything in tape. Makes it a lot easier when trouble shooting, adding new wires for accessories and it doesnt trap water.
WERD! Split loom is awesome! Tip: Buy it in bulk! For what you would pay for three or so pre cut packages you can get a 100' roll! You will use it yup faster than you think so don't worry about having to much!
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  #29  
Old 05-09-2009, 01:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RicardoJM View Post
The spring for the horn brush is the bright silver piece at the top. From my research, the horn brush and spring are getting to be as scarce as hens teeth, so keep an eye on yours.
Awesome write-up Ricardo, keep it coming!

By now most folks should have their May/June Toyota Trails. Robbie has a trick he used for the horn spring on an FJ62, which might work on other applications. He used a spring from a ball-point pen. Cool cheap fix!
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  #30  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:10 PM
koondog67 koondog67 is offline
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Default Nice post on P/S conversion

You said that you used an air pump bracket to mount the P/S pump. What type of air pump bracket did you use? Was it an fj40 bracket? What year? My 72 does not have a smog pump on it.. Thanks
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